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How to Utilize Podcasts to Propel Your Female-Owned Business

How to Utilize Podcasts to Propel Your Female-Owned Business

Word of mouth tends to be the most organic and secure method of giving authority to a business. And little is a more efficient word of mouth method than a 40-minute episode podcast that organically highlights said company.

Podcasts deliver messages to a niche audience and a platform that invites listeners and hosts to connect on a more personal level. They instill trust for audiences with the host and guest, therefore bettering the consumer relationship. They amplify your voice or can even substitute traditional marketing and public relations.

Four female podcast gurus share tips on ways podcasts can propel your business.

How to begin successfully.

With all the pros that come with podcasting, why isn't everyone jumping on the trend? For most, anxiety often comes from taking the first steps and simply beginning. While her podcast is now thriving, Lauren Salaun, business coach and host, acknowledges that her perfectionism and procrastination got in the way of starting what is now her successful Amplify Podcast, which helps entrepreneurs discover their inner power.

And Rubi Skilton, a podcast producer of Flaunt Your Flaws, audio expert, limb difference advocate, speaker, and entrepreneur, knows this feeling entirely too well. In fact, she spent years of her life wishing she had a platform to advocate for those like her, born with a physical difference. And then one day, Skilton just bit the bullet — researched, and created a product that resonated with many audiences. Following her brave jump into the podcast world, she now helps other entrepreneurs — predominantly female — begin their journey.

However, it is essential to do this back research first, as about 85% of podcasts will never get past the third episode. How does one not become part of that statistic? Skilton says:

The best advice I can give someone that's just starting a podcast is to do the pre-work, set yourself up for success, and have a plan when you start your podcast. Know who your audience is, what your purpose is, your mission, the structure you want to have, create an environment that will give you decent audio, and commit to it.

Additionally, do not underestimate the work that goes into podcasting. Sarah Karakaian, co-host of Thanks for Visiting, a podcast that helps entrepreneurs level up in the housing rental industry, says:

There is so much that goes into podcasting beyond pressing that record button and having insanely valuable content to share. But, it's so worth it! We decided from day one to hire a production company who would help us get our episodes out there into the world, complete with show notes and other podcasting best practices.

[Related: How to Thrive in the Reinvention Revolution]

Hook the potential consumers.

Podcasts tend to be a low-risk, high reward for the outcome. The dollar investment for investing in a podcast isn't costly compared to other forms of marketing, but your platform can reach millions of consumers. The trick is being able to hook the potential consumer.

Neeley Neal, female founder and host of The Neeley Neal Show, a motivational podcast for female athletes, believes that tuning into a podcast is convenient for the audience when the messaging is suitable for the consumer:

When you're open to what the host has to say, you welcome it. It's a natural rhythm of relationship building that's not manufactured, so it's a sweet spot to make a genuine connection.

Successful podcast episodes are the key to building these thriving relationships. Salaun goes by three words when crafting her episodes: know, like, and trust. She says:

Podcasts help to increase the know-like-trust factor of your business and brand. People buy from and invest with those that they know, like, and trust. Podcasts are potent tools to do just that. Because podcasts tend to feel very intimate, they are one of the fastest ways to build trust and connection with your audience.

Podcasting allows business owners to talk about their background, mission, and purpose for the brand and give authority to niche topics. Skilton says:

A podcast allows the customer to build a relationship with the owners and assists with the know, like, and trust factors. This will no doubt increase your sales because you are building that bridge between your products or services and your customers.

[Related: Cultivate These Five Mindsets to Become Your Community’s Go-to Expert]

Create meaningful connections.

While you can create a trusting relationship with your consumers, you can also bring in new consumers for your brand. Neal maintains that creating a podcast is:

A natural discovery platform, to reach new audiences, and it's also a prolific partnership and PR beacon for like-minded experts and businesses to find you.

Salaun enjoys when guests share about being on her show because people from their audiences come and listen, and many of those first-time listeners will join her community. She says: 

The messages I receive from listeners, their vulnerability, the breakthroughs they have from listening to the show – that fills me up so much, and I don't think I'll ever really get completely used to it.

Karakaian concludes:

We have become a voice of authority in our industry which has opened so many other doors for us. We not only do solo episodes on our show, but we invite industry experts as well — and we've made sure to seize the opportunity to connect with our guests beyond their time on our podcast. Your network is your net worth. These connections have led to many powerful collaboration opportunities and additional creative ways to provide educational value to our audience — our number one goal!

[Related: Seven Powerful Tech Podcasts to Boost Your Career]

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Olivia Liveng (nee Balsinger) is an experienced storytelling coach, brand strategist, entertainment producer, and CEO of Liveng Public Relations, an agency amplifying hospitality, tourism, and female voices. She's also an award-winning travel journalist, with bylines in Fodors, Forbes, New York Post, Business Insider, and LA Style. Find her on Instagram at @livliveng.

Carly Orris is a freelance writer and publicist based in New York. Her writing focuses on female empowerment, travel, entertainment, and lifestyle. Find her on Instagram at @carlyorris.


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